Soldiers stand.

The Canadian Armed Forces mainly provided training in peacekeeping and first aid in combat zones. (Archive photo)

Photo: The U.S. Press / Sean Kilpatrick

The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) have just completed a nearly month-long mission in Jamaica to train Caribbean Community (CARICOM) troops in preparation for their deployment to Haiti. The latter will join the multinational security support mission led by Kenya.

The mission, called Operation Hélios, consisted of offeringinstruction in peacekeeping and combat first aid skills for the troops of the CARICOM by simulating situations in hostile zones.

Some 70 members of FAC, mainly soldiers from the 1st Battalion of the Royal 22nd Regiment in Valcartier, were deployed during this mission requested by the Jamaican government, which ended on Friday. These soldiers trained troops from Jamaica, but also from Belize and the Bahamas.

What we had here was the culmination of about eight months of effort, planning, training and integration of different countries […] for a trial period of four to five weeksrejoices the lieutenant-colonel and commander of the forces of the CARICOMKevron Henry. What you have seen is only a glimpse of the capabilities and skills of the region’s military forces.

A positive outcome

The commander of FCC for Operation Hélios, Colonel Tarik Messous, specifies that the Canadian mission was intended to share our training and expertise in first aid and combat casualty care.

In addition to medical intervention in combat zones, Canada trained the troops of CARICOM regarding air evacuation techniques for casualties and offered logistical support, following the approach recommended by Ottawa.

FAC is part of the Canadian government’s approach, a comprehensive approach with the aim of responding to the insecurity and the humanitarian crisis taking place in Haiti, explains Mr.My money. We are only part of that response, and, obviously, we are happy to contribute and help people around the world. “,”text”:”The work carried out by the FAC is part of the Canadian government’s approach, a comprehensive approach with the aim of responding to the insecurity and the humanitarian crisis taking place in Haiti, explains Mr. Messous . We are only part of that response, and, obviously, we are happy to contribute and help people around the world. The work carried out by the FCC is part of the Canadian government’s approach, a comprehensive approach with the aim of responding to the insecurity and the humanitarian crisis taking place in Haiti, explains Mr. Messous. We are only part of that response, and, obviously, we are happy to contribute and help people around the world.

According to the comments received by his counterparts and his own observations on the ground, Colonel Messous affirms that he is impressive to see what Canada can deliver in terms of expertise and training and is delighted with the Canadian military contribution.

They are grateful for the help and mentoring received. I can say, on behalf of the forces that took part in the operation and the Kenyan forces, that we have accomplished our goal.

A quote from Tarik Messous, colonel of the Canadian Armed Forces and commander for Operation Hélios

A rich partnership

Jamaica’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Kamina Johnson Smith, is also satisfied with the Canadian mission in her country and believes that the CARICOM now has a ready operational force to intervene in Haiti.

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We have completed training on peacekeeping, special operations and forces, infrastructure, hostage recovery, etc. This is the work that is being done here to ensure that we are ready to provide support whenever we are asked to do so.added the minister regarding the success of Operation Hélios.

Armed police officers in a car.

CARICOM troops trained by the FAC will help Haitian police and military forces confront gangs and allow the return of a climate of security to the country. (Archive photo)

Photo: Reuters / Ralph Tedy Erol

For her part, the High Commissioner for Canada in Jamaica, Emina Tudakovic, insists on the long-standing partnership that exists between Canada and Jamaica, and Caribbean nations more broadly. This partnership is manifested in particular on the military level.

FCC have been working together for over 60years, so this type of operation is intended to be a continuation of this commitment. Jamaica has been our greatest partner in terms of military activities. Jamaica’s forces and the CAF have worked together for over 60 years, so this type of operation is a continuation of that commitment. Jamaica has been our largest partner in military activities. Jamaican forces and FCC have been working together for over 60 years, so this type of operation is intended to be a continuation of this commitmentshe says.

She adds that Canada brought significant expertise regarding air evacuation.

Stabilizing the transition in Haiti

The 330 troops of CARICOM trained will soon join the deployment of Kenyan police in Haiti as part of an international mission supported byUN to bring peace there. Commander Kevron Henry is also confident about the level of effectiveness of his troops, which he considers ready to intervene in Haiti.

They are, I believe, capable of intervening and carrying out high-intensity operations to restore order in places like Haiti or elsewhere in the world. According to our assessment, we are capable of confronting the challenges that may arise in any environment, including Port-au-Prince.

Although Haiti recently had a Presidential Transitional Council, the country still remains without a president and is still grappling with an outbreak of violence, the latter having complicated the return to Canada of several nationals stuck in the country earlier this year. month.

Pending the formation of a new cabinet, Haiti’s Minister of Economy and Finance, Michel Patrick Boisvert, was named interim prime minister. However, no date has been set for the military intervention in Haiti.

With information from Danielle Kadjo and CBC News

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